According to popular public imagination, as we head towards the future at warp speed, technology is managing and “optimizing” our lives more and more. Already ads follow us on social media, recommendation systems offer products we might want and need, deep fake videos transform political discourse, and dating apps make it easier to establish connections, particularly during desperate and lonesome times of lockdown. But what if we had technology at our disposal that would allow us to “optimize” the search and find true love without all the trial and error? …


How collaborative society has come to the rescue where late capitalism has failed.

Authors: Dariusz Jemielniak, Aleksandra Przegalinska

A project codenamed Aura emerged some 13 years ago, with support and funding from U.S. public health officials, after the warning signs from SARS, MERS, swine and bird flue near-pandemics. Its purpose was developing and producing a large number of inexpensive, portable ventilators, to address one of the bottlenecks of the healthcare system we are facing now. Can you guess what happened? A corporation producing medical devices took over the small company hired to design the new machines. Ultimately, none were produced.

Stefan Krause, Germany / FAL, Wikimedia Commons CC-BY-NC-ND https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gl%C3%BChlampe_explodiert.jpg

Now, collaborative society, relying…


Remember the Moral Machine Test (http://moralmachine.mit.edu)? It’s a platform designed by The Scalable Cooperation Group at the MIT Media Lab for gathering a human perspective on moral decisions made by self-driving cars. The Group generated various moral dilemmas, revolving around the well-known trolley problem, where a driverless car had to choose the lesser of two evils, such as, for instance, killing two young people or one pregnant woman and one senior. More than 2 million people participated in the test, submitting their answers on which outcome they thought was more acceptable. They could then see how their responses compared with…


Transhumanism does not aim to replace human beings with “better models”. It is quite the opposite — transhumanism is an expression of respect for the human as a being that creates, invents and perpetually moves forward.

Natasha Vita-More is an American designer and theorist. She is designer and author of “Primo Posthuman,” a future whole body prototype. Vita-More is an adjunct professor at the for-profit University of Advancing Technology (2012-current), and a Fellow of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies. She is currently Chairman of the Board of Directors of Humanity+.

Aleksandra Przegalinska interviewed professor Natasha Vita-More during the…


One of the key current challenges in the social sciences is to re-think how the rapid progress of technology has impacted constructs such as trust. This is specifically true for information technology that dramatically alters causation in social systems: AI, wearable tech, bots, virtual assistants and data. All that requires new definitions of TRUST. I’m really hoping to engage in discussion that would help us move forward in this urging field.


Recently, the long-awaited Facebook like button upgrade — Facebook reactions, went live allowing users more ways to express themselves through the social channel. The new options provided users the chance to more accurately express a variety of feelings in re- sponse to posts and shares by their community. This change was welcomed by many Facebook users who requested for a „dislike” more than 6 years ago and wished they were able to show support in more than just likes, particularly when responding to a post in the face of tragedy or unpleasantness. The new spectrum of Facebook reactions allow to…


Can machine-stories teach us anything? And do we want to learn?

We know that telling stories serves building and maintainig communities, translating the complexity of the world, and developing good qualities in people. However, with the advent of new technologies, storytelling gains a completely new dimension.

My co-researchers and I designed a natural language speaking chatbot and conducted an electromiography-based experiment (EMG) to understand the quality of our bot’s interactions with human interlocutors. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative research we attempted to track the dynamics of affective states of individuals during the conversations with computers. …


Mind-tracking is currently gaining momentum and seems to be the ultimate form of tracking that makes the brain (and the mind?) transparent. Tracking of parameters that correlate best with various mental processes can bring about a profound change in our understanding of productivity: empowering the individual and toppling over the top-down solutions of modern corporations. In our work, we’d like to ask what will be the future of mind-tracking in the era of sharing economy. Will cooperative individualism, as a cultural basis of P2P economy, prevail and can we imagine mind-tracking playing a role in this process?

Today, we are…


Bots become ubiquitous, but we still haven’t really figured out how the ned users really feel about them.

Long time ago (about 45 years), in a galaxy not far away (Japan), Masahiro Mori discovered the so-called Uncanny Valley effect that he described very dilligently in a pioneering article on human-computer relation from psychological perspective (recent English translation here: http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/humanoids/the-uncanny-valley).

Mori observed a heightened sensitivity to defects in near-humanlike forms — an uncanny valley in what is otherwise a positive relationship between human likeness and familiarity. While the reasons for the effect Mori observed are still unknown, there has been a…


In November 25, 2008, “The New York Times” published an article by Cornelia Dean that went largely unnoticed around the world. “A Soldier, Taking Orders From Its Ethical Judgment Center” was based on an interview that Dean conducted with Dr. Ronald C. Arkin. In it, Dr. Arkin describes his work for the U.S. Army, which involves designing robot drones, mine detectors, and sensing devices. He also mentions that his greatest dream is to construct an autonomous robot that would be capable of acting on its own on the battlefield, making decisions without taking orders from humans. …

Aleksandra Przegalinska

Artificial Intelligence fan and researcher. Associate Professor @Kozminski University. Post-doc @MIT and Senior Researcher Fellow @Harvard LWP

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